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Uglies

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Introduction:
Reading can be bogus, or very unhappy-making, so how can reading be made bubbly? The answer is Scott Westerfeld’s scientifically brilliant, fiction book called the Uglies. Reading can also open a door to a world of romance, mysteries, drama, and education; creating a magical allusion for the reader. In the book, Uglies, by Scott Westerfeld, he did more than open a door to another world, he actually “created” his own world! Most of the books on the fiction reading list offer romance, mysteries, drama, and education; but few offer an equal balance of all four. Uglies is a book that offers all four of these elements plus more. In Scott Westerfeld’s book embraces a special message, fabricated with figurative language; the stories lack predictable, fairy tale endings. In high school, a teenager often faces the realities of: life vs. death; ugly vs. pretty; and love vs. rejection. Scott Westerfeld animates an image of these three realities and the principles learned with each by using his characters as victims or crims (criminals). Also, in Scott Westerfeld’s book, he takes a more modern approach to using adjectives, using words like: “bogus”, “unhappy-making”, “bubbly”, and “crims” are just a sample of Westerfeld’s diction. Scott Westerfeld’s purpose for creating the book Uglies is to question the order of the world surrounding human life, by creating a futuristic world he was able to highlight the problems that are seen in the reader’s world. Offering more than one aspect for the reader to grow from, Uglies is the perfect book to have on the fiction reading list. Being Ugly:

Tally Youngblood is the main character of the book Uglies. Although, she is the main character and also the protagonist, the reader doesn’t always agree with Tally’s point of view. Tally’s world is different in structure from the reader’s world. The people in Tally’s world are controlled, unable to think open-mindedly, and make decisions for themselves. The reader is able to see...