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Types of Population Growth

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Types of Population Growth

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  • Feb. 2009
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Types of Population growth

It has often been suggested that there are a number of distinct stages in demographic growth through which populations pass. the stages being collectively known as the population cycle or demographic transition. The stages are drawn from European experience, but it does not follow that other populations will pursue the same course. Indeed, it is most likely that the experience of populations in non-industrial countries will be greatly telescoped through the benefit of technical assistance from the more advanced countries (fig. 23). In other words. there is no rigid model of population growth, and the model for developing countries differs from that for developed countries. Consequently the following classification of stages of population growth. Which has been commonly used for developed countries, is not generally suitable for developing countries:

1. High stationary phase, with high fertility .and mortality and only slow growth or a stationary population; 2. Early expanding phase, with high fertility declining mortality.. causing an increasing rate of growth 3. Late expanding phase. with declining fertility and mortality, and rapid increase; .. 4. Low stationary phase, with low fertility and mortality causing a fairly stationary population: 5. Declining phase, resulting from the fall of fertility below mortality.. It is perhaps better to think of types of population growth rather than stages, as for example in the United Nations classification made in the late 1950è. and adapted in Fig. 24 to the late 1960s: -

1. High birth and death rates, common in some of the least-developed countries, as in tropical Africa; 2’. High Birth rates and declining fairly high death rates, as in many parts of South, South-East and East Asia: 3. High birth rates and fairly low death rates, common in tropical Latin America, where growth rates usually exceed 3 per cent annum; 4. Declining birth, rates and low death rates, as for example...