Tycho Brahe

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Jessica Guisti
Science and Belief
Extra Credit

Galileo believed in the helio-centric theory of Copernicus. Even though at the time of this theory there was nothing that proved it wrong until the Jupiter moons proved Ptolemy wrong, they did not prove Copernicus right. Then Tycho Brahe came along at the time that alternative explanations of planetary movements and introduced an intermediate theory that used mathematics in creating a model in which the planets revolved around the sun and together with the sun revolved around the stationary earth. This theory was just as satisfactory as the Copernican system.

Throughout 1630 to 1687 most astronomers preferred this model of explanation. At this time Galileo refused to consider the legitimacy or accuracy of Brahe’s model as he refused to consider the possibility that planets moved in patterns other than circles. Galileo’s model consisted of solely circular motions and refused to accept any theory of motions that were oval. He states, “seems unthinkable and quite inconsistent with the appearances,” as Galileo’s theory demanded circles as a physical reality.

Tycho Brahe introduced the third system and at the time it still had not been scientifically proven. It was understood that unqualified support for the helio-centric theory was impossible until Brahe’s system had been disproved. Galileo then had a dispute with the Church, as they didn’t agree with his theories. Galileo set these issues off to the side and created the Dialogue on the Two Great World Systems in which he contrasted the Ptolemaic and Copernican systems, as he left out the newer systems of Kepler and Brahe. Galileo believed that he discovered the important proof of the earth’s motion that he had been searching for, rejecting Kepler’s current notion that the moon causes the alternation of the tides. Galileo completely disregards any other theories and it is quite obvious that he remains close-minded to any other ideas.

Galileo was overly...
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