Twelve Angry Men

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  • Topic: Verdict, Jury, Not proven
  • Pages : 2 (927 words )
  • Download(s) : 453
  • Published : August 7, 2012
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Topic: The judge tells the jurors it is their ‘duty to try and separate that the facts from the fancy’. How do the jurors separate the facts from the fancy? ‘Twelve Angry Men’ is a drama play written by Regional Rose in 1954 which was set in a jury-room of a New York Court of Law, 1957 during a very hot summer afternoon. The jurors are asked to come up with a verdict whether the boys are guilty or not. The judge states: “You’ve listened to the testimony and you’ve had the law read to you and interpreted as it applies to this case. It now becomes your duty to separate the facts from the fancy.” Duty is something you have to do. Fancy is an idea or opinion that is not based on facts. So, in other words, the jurors have to sit down and decide what is true and what is not true. Throughout the play, Juror 8 patiently and courageously convinces the majority he has to oppose at the start to change their vote and is able to identify the ‘fancy’ and the ‘facts’. However, there is Juror 4, a stock broker who appears to be a very mentally tough man, who only cares about facts, has no sense of consideration along with the likes of Juror 3, Juror 7 or 12 who absolutely show no interest in either ‘fancy’ or ‘facts’. They basically just pick their vote based on personal emotions or don’t take any responsibilities at all. The play starts off with a vote conducted by Juror 1, also known as the Foreman. Eleven vote not guilty yet Juror 8 bravely chooses to go against the rest. He is the first one who brings up the idea of ‘fancy’ through the explanation of his reasonable doubts such as the knife, the el train, the amount of time the old man takes, the woman across the street, the glasses. However, they maybe or are not real, they’re just assumptions, they represent the fancy. However, he does not actively uses all these evidences to persuade the other that the defendant is not guilty, “I’m not trying to change your mind”, the fact that he really understands ‘the boy may die’. His...
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