Tsunamis Brochure

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Tsunamis, the ins and outs

What is a tsunami? Tsunamis (Japanese for “Harbor Wave”) are series of waves that are characterized by their massive wavelengths, often about 120 miles long, whereas a normal wave has one of about 333 feet, and destruction that they bring when they hit land. They are often called tidal waves, but incorrectly so. They have virtually nothing to do with the tides. Tsunamis can range from a few feet in height to over a hundred feet in height and can travel up to 500mph. What causes tsunamis? Tsunamis are caused by a change in the ocean’s basin that displaces massive amounts of water. This can be brought on by a number of different events, such as an earthquake, large meteors, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and even massive underwater explosions. The most common of these causes, however, is earthquakes.

Warning signs that a tsunami may be imminent One of the most characteristic signs of an incoming tsunami is the drawback. Before a tsunami hits, the water along coastal areas will retreat large distances leaving much more beach than usual exposed. People often remain on the beach to pick up interesting objects or because they are curious. Large earthquakes, landslides, or eruptions may also signify that a tsunami is possible. Areas susceptible to tsunamis Indonesia remains of the most susceptible areas of the world to the destructive power tsunamis bring. They have little technology that can potentially warn them of an incoming tsunamis due to the inadequate funds needed to do this. Inadequate funds also means that many areas remain without any sort of walls or levees that could potentially help minimize damage. Tsunamis are also quite frequent in this area due to the...
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