Truth in the Great Gatsby

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 118
  • Published : May 14, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Seth Shearer
English III
Mrs.Hausberger

Truth in The Great Gatsby

The Golden Age, a time when money was abundant. Wealthy

family's always demanded to impress others rather than living their own

life. How did wealth seem to develop with scandals and how would dreams

contribute to destiny? In F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel "The Great Gatsby"

Nick Carraway's great American dream was to controlled the truth in which

he lives his life.

Money is a motivating force for almost everyone, but not everyone

loses sight of who they are. Gatsby's house and parties were a part of the

shows he wanted to impress Daisy with. Daisy, confused by Gatsby's money

and wealth tried drawing away from her husband Tom when she saw financial

security with Gatsby. Although Nick was tempted to be successful and

wealthy he viewed ethics and even his own morals to be additionally

significant.

Most of the Characters in the Great Gatsby lived so

materialistically that their own values and ethics suffered and really

never showed. Nick's friends in the novel illustrated ignorant fools, Tom

was careless. Tom was ignorant to the fact that cheating on a spouse was

and still is looked down upon. Nick as the Conventionalist he is,

displayed the character who looked down upon this affair. He didn't agree

with the fact that his friend Tom could love his wife while he lusted some

other woman. Nicks beliefs were never similar to Tom's, and later he

confronted Tom telling his disapproval of his actions. Tom, Daisy, and

Jordan showed no affection or remorse after the death of both Gatsby and

Myrtle. Nick percepted that his friends convinced themselves with their

own lies that nothing at all actually happened.

Even when the story focused on Daisy Buchanan and Jay Gatsby's

relationship, Nick's love with his mistress Jordan...
tracking img