Truman Doctrine

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The Truman Doctrine, an American policy that was passed on April 22, 1947, was considered to be “a blank check to give economic and military aid to any area in the world where the communists show signs of being successful.” (Gimbel 1976) The doctrine was originated to stop the Soviets from spreading their influence on Greece and Turkey after the collapse of the United Kingdom’s economy. [1]

· Acheson encouraged Truman to address the spread of Communism as an infection (The Domino Theory) and the country will support him in supporting Greece and Turkey.[2]

· Truman’s proposal was rushed through the Senate and House of Representatives as fear of Greece falling into “Soviet orbit”[3]

· Bevin wanted to bring in America to balance out Russia’s power on Europe. (Although Bevin did not know that America was formulating the doctrine at the time.)[4]

· United States thought Great Britain was going to side with Russia when it announced that it will no longer support Greece and Turkey. After further analysis, the United States determined that Great Britain can no longer financially support the two countries; thus, the U.S would have to step in or else Great Britain might make a deal with the Russians.[5]

· A few months after the Truman Doctrine was implemented, the State Department under the command of Marshall and several of his expertise, George Marshall made a speech on June 5, 1947 at Harvard that was known as the European Recovery Plan. This plan that lasted for three years was intended to help restore economies as well as to give the countries in Western Europe some hope and spirit after the devastation of the war. Furthermore, George Marshall was convinced that by stabilizing Western Europe, it would revitalize national economy as well as stopping advances of communism in Europe. [6]

· The Marshall Plan not only financially supported European countries, but it also allowed the United States to its...
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