Trojan War and Orestes Mother

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Ahmed Ahmed 12/04/08 Prof. Staines

Lit 230-02

Oresteia Paper

People suffer for many different reasons, and they cope with the suffering the only way they know how. In addition, sometimes people seek their own justice for their suffering. There is always controversy about what is justified and what is not. In Oresteia, Aeschylus portrays suffering for many characters; however, Clytemnestra suffers the most. Therefore, Aeschylus illustrates Clytemnestra’s suffering when her husband is at war, and then to add to that suffering, the sacrifice of her daughter, so she murders Agamemnon claiming it was justifiable in avenge for her daughter’s death and thinks that it helps put an end to her suffering.

When someone suffers, they sustain a pain or a loss from their suffering. Zeus says “Man must learn by suffering” (Chorus, Agamemnon, 178). Therefore, in order to prevent that pain or loss from occurring again, one must learn from their suffering. One way to learn from suffering is to obtain fear as a lesson from suffering. Fear is what prevents someone from making the same mistake because they do not want to suffer the same consequences. Clytemnestra does not obtain fear as a lesson of her suffering. The first event of Clytemnestra’s suffering takes place when her husband, Agamemnon, is at war. She suffers from the rumors that were being spread during Agamemnon’s absence. Clytemnestra says “These rumors ate away at me, to the point that I had to be released, against my will, from the noose of suicide, more than once.” (Clytemnestra, Agamemnon, 873-875). So by being a faithful wife while he was gone and ignoring all the rumors that were told, she prevented any additional suffering.

Another event of Clytemnestra’s suffering is also when Agamemnon is gone during the Trojan War. Clytemnestra suffers many years from loneliness and...
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