Trends in South African Income Distribution

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Leibbrandt, M. et al. (2010), "Trends in South African Income Distribution and Poverty since the Fall of Apartheid", OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers, No. 101, OECD Publishing, © OECD. doi:10.1787/5kmms0t7p1ms-en

OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers No. 101

Trends in South African Income Distribution and Poverty since the Fall of Apartheid Murray Leibbrandt*, Ingrid Woolard, Arden Finn, Jonathan Argent

JEL Classification: D31, I32, I38

*

University of Cape Town, South Africa

Unclassified
Organisation de Coopération et de Développement Économiques Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

DELSA/ELSA/WD/SEM(2010)1

20-Jan-2010 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ English - Or. English

DIRECTORATE FOR EMPLOYMENT, LABOUR AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS

EMPLOYMENT, LABOUR AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

DELSA/ELSA/WD/SEM(2010)1 Unclassified
OECD SOCIAL, EMPLOYMENT AND MIGRATION WORKING PAPERS No. 101 TRENDS IN SOUTH AFRICAN INCOME DISTRIBUTION AND POVERTY SINCE THE FALL OF APARTHEID Murray Leibbrandt, Ingrid Woolard, Arden Finn and Jonathan Argent Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, School of Economics, University of Cape Town JEL Classification: D31, I32, I38

All Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers are now available through the OECD website at www.oecd.org/els/workingpapers English - Or. English

JT03277255
Document complet disponible sur OLIS dans son format d'origine Complete document available on OLIS in its original format

DELSA/ELSA/WD/SEM(2010)1

DIRECTORATE FOR EMPLOYMENT, LABOUR AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS
www.oecd.org/els

OECD SOCIAL, EMPLOYMENT AND MIGRATION WORKING PAPERS
www.oecd.org/els/workingpapers

This series is designed to make available to a wider readership selected labour market, social policy and migration studies prepared for use within the OECD. Authorship is usually collective, but principal writers are named. The papers are generally available only in their original language – English or French – with a summary in the other. Comment on the series is welcome, and should be sent to the Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs, 2, rue André-Pascal, 75775 PARIS CEDEX 16, France. The opinions expressed and arguments employed here are the responsibility of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD.

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DELSA/ELSA/WD/SEM(2010)1

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We would like to thank Michael Förster of the OECD Social Policy Division for detailed and excellent commentary and advice. It has been a pleasure working with him. Useful discussion on an earlier draft of this paper followed its presentation at the 28th Meeting of the Working Party on Social Policy on 19 October 2009. We thank the participants.

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DELSA/ELSA/WD/SEM(2010)1

ABSTRACT

1. This report presents a detailed analysis of changes in both poverty and inequality since the fall of Apartheid, and the potential drivers of such developments. Use is made of national survey data from 1993, 2000 and 2008. These data show that South Africa’s high aggregate level of income inequality increased between 1993 and 2008. The same is true of inequality within each of South Africa’s four major racial groups. Income poverty has fallen slightly in the aggregate but it persists at acute levels for the African and Coloured racial groups. Poverty in urban areas has increased. There have been continual improvements in non-monetary well-being (for example, access to piped water, electricity and formal housing) over the entire post-Apartheid period up to 2008. 2. From a policy point of view it is important to flag the fact that...
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