Treaty of Waitangi

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  • Topic: New Zealand, Treaty of Waitangi, Constitution of New Zealand
  • Pages : 2 (309 words )
  • Download(s) : 234
  • Published : April 8, 2013
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Intro

On The 6th February 1840 more than 40 Māori chiefs signed the treaty of Waitangi. At the time prior to the signing the British government thought it was necessary to have a treaty to protect the there interests in New Zealand. The Māori felt the treaty was an agreement with the British government. The missionaries felt a treaty was important to protect the Māori.

Attitudes in 1840 (prior to the signing)

Both British and Māori thought the treaty of Waitangi was a positive step forward to protecting their interests. The missionaries thought it was important to negotiate a treaty between the Māori and the British to protect Māori rights. The British government felt they needed a treaty to protect interests in New Zealand such as land and trade. The Māori thought the treaty was an agreement between the British government.

Contemporary attitudes toward the treaty of Waitangi

Since the 1970s, the Māori have called for the terms of the treaty to be honoured. They have done this by protesting for rights such as land for example the land march in 1940 a Māori lady carried a potion from northland to parliament in wellington.

The New Zealand government set up a Waitangi tribunal in 1975 to check out Māori claims and grievances. A claimant is a person that makes a claim for example the Katina River Claim the Māori were worried about a waste pipe going into the river and was settled by a claimant.

There is debate within the treaty of Waitangi because of the two different languages meaning different meanings.

Conclusion

Attitudes towards the treaty of Waitangi in 1840 (prior to the signing) where positive and negative. As a result of the signing the attitudes are mostly positive apart from some Māori that have grievances to loss of land and felt they had loss of rights.
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