Treaty of Rome

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The Treaty of Rome
The Treaty of Rome was signed on March 25th 1957 and was described as ‘one of Europe’s greatest achievements’. It was the founding treaty of the European Economic Community (EEC) which later became the EU. The goal of the Treaty of Rome was to unify Europe by providing a common market and similar economic policies for its member states. It aimed to promote harmonious development and economic co-operation in order to ‘eliminate the barriers which divide Europe.’ It was initially signed by France, Belgium, Luxemburg, Italy, Netherlands and West Germany. The Treaty of Rome strived to create a better quality of life among its people by feeding them and supplying energy, they introduced policies such as workers’ rights and promoted leisure time among the people. Prior to the 1950’s young people wore the same style of clothes as their parents and grandparents, but with the introduction of a leisure/consumer society people began dressing differently. There was a distinct market aimed at young people and the youth culture, and this all stemmed from the Treaty of Rome and it’s creation of a brand new integrated Europe with no borders to separate societies. It was agreed that companies in the member states would not compete against each other and develop policies together in order to increase stability among the countries in Europe and raise the standard of living. The impact the Treaty of Rome had on Europe was that it gave people aspirations for a better life and more options such as going to university and the possibility of emigration. The members states of the TOR wanted to diminish ‘nationalistic opposition’ and move from a common market to a single entity – which is where the idea of the Euro originated from as it was seen as the ultimate statement in European integration. The idea of a united Europe started with coal and steel, but by 1970 all the economic barriers were gone and both goods and people were able to move around Europe freely....
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