Transportation in Kuala Lumpur.

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Comprehensive and efficient transportation system networks with good inter and intra city linkages are essential enabling factors to ensure Kuala Lumpur’s position as an international commercial and financial centre.

For the residents of Kuala Lumpur, the City must be able to provide an efficient and equitable city structure that, as far as possible, allows all members of the community equal accessibility to all areas and facilities so that everyone may enjoy the maximum benefits of city living.

The basic structure is now in place with a comprehensive road and rail network that has been built up since 1984, and the programme now for Kuala Lumpur will be to develop, refine and integrate this transportation system to serve the City and its population until 2020.

Existing situation and issue

(a)Transport modal share

i.Existing situation

Between 1985 and 1997, the modal share of public transport decreased from 34.3 percent to 19.7 percent. This represents a major shift away from public transport and in particular bus transport, which is partly attributable to higher personal affluence leading to an increase in car ownership and also to deficiencies in the bus services. The increasing reliance on private transportation, in particular private cars, has created considerable pressure on the road network which has contributed to the problems of traffic congestion.

ii. Issue

• Low public transport modal share resulting in high demand on road infrastructure and traffic congestion.

b) Travel demand

i. Existing situation

Increased affluence and out migration from Kuala Lumpur have both contributed to the present traffic congestion problems in the City Centre. Between 1980 and 1997, the population of Kuala Lumpur maintained an annual growth rate of 1.1 percent while from 1985 to 1997 person trips by cars increased at an average annual growth rate of 4.2 percent in the Klang Valley Region.

It is also significant that, although the population of the City Centre accounts for only 3.3 percent of total population of the Klang Valley Region, approximately 19 percent of the 8.3 million person trips made daily within the Klang Valley Region are trips generated in the City Centre.

The high travel demand has been met in large part by private transportation in particular, private cars. As a consequence, there has been congestion and a serious deterioration of travel speed on major roads in many parts of Kuala Lumpur, especially in the City Centre as well as in the east and south, due to major traffic routes operating at or above capacity during peak hours. Low vehicle occupancy has further aggravated the problem.

ii. Issue

• High travel demand to and from the City Centre during peak hours.

c) Traffic management

i. Existing situation

Traffic management measures are aimed at optimizing the existing infrastructure to improve flow capacities and to be more responsive to traffic demand at different times of the day.
Various measures have been successfully implemented in Kuala Lumpur. The principal means of traffic control in the City presently comprises a computer based area traffic signal coordination system (SCATS/ITACA) that operates 130 intersections, supplemented by the traffic police during peak hours. Extension of the existing traffic control system, together with an upgrading of the system’s capability, is currently being implemented in phases.

Other traffic control measures which contribute to traffic management in Kuala Lumpur include the one-way street system, reversible lanes to increase lane capacity during morning peak hours, exclusive bus/taxi lanes, penalties for illegal on-street parking and regulations controlling heavy vehicle entry into the City Centre during peak hours.

Additional measures that relate to road safety are through the use of traffic signage, barriers, pavement line marking and pedestrian bridges....
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