Trainer

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Trainer

By | Feb. 2013
Page 1 of 11
Obesity and Fast Food
Kari E. Busard
Western Illinois University

Abstract
Research concerning the relationship between obesity in children and adults and fast-food restaurants thus far has been limited. Much of the hypotheses made in regard to the effect that consumption of fast food has on the overall body mass index (BMI) is what you would expect – that one’s BMI increases with consumption of fast food items due to high calorie intake. In addition to nutritional info, there are various other factors that studies examine in order to better understand the choices and effects. These factors include but are not limited to media influence, proximity to fat food locations, and parents influence over children. In the past 2 years there have been measures put into place by the Federal Government in order to provide all the necessary information to consumer about what they are choosing to buy and consume. For example, in 2010 US Congress passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, requiring nutritional labeling for all menu items for fast food locations. As new laws and regulations are passed; continued and additional research is needed to understand the behaviors of individuals in regard to choosing food items outside of the home.

Obesity and the World
The construct of our world has changed much over the past 50 years with advancements in entertainment, technology, and daily life processes. We are a nation bound by our environment rich with information at our fingertips and a vast amount of shops and restaurants all within our grasp with relative ease. With our lifestyle’s changing, come various choices that seem easy and convenient, but all together may not be best for our overall health. More specifically, with fast food, or convenience food, locations seemingly on every corner, we must examine how consuming these “easy” foods has affected our health as a whole. First, let’s get some understanding...