Trafficking of Women for Sexual Exploitation

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  • Topic: Advertising, Sexual objectification, Objectification
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  • Published : September 7, 2011
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The Exploitation Of Women In Ads
The exploitation of women in Ads

What are the dangers for the companies to use such types of ads? What are the different reactions of men and women to this kind of ads ?

Introduction
The exploitation of women in the media has been part of the advertising industry since its beginning, although the level to which women have been exploited has changed drastically. Advertising is a highly visible and seemingly controversial agent of socialization (Paff, Lakner, 1997). Indeed, it appears everywhere in our lives, on television, on the internet, on busses, in our mailbox, in magazines, and now in the toilets of our favourite restaurants or nightclubs. Jean Kilbourne, one of the best-known advocate of raising awareness about the exploitation of women in advertising, claims that, “we are exposed to over 2000 ads a day, constituting perhaps the most powerful educational force in society”. But the problem is that it often exploits women as sex objects and adornment strips women of their individual identities. Women are viewed as “things”, objects of male sexual desire, and/or part of the merchandise rather than people (Hall, Crum, 1994).   Body exposure and frequency of these ads have increased at an alarming rate over time.   Fashion photography has incorporated blatantly sexual poses from pornographic publications that include sexual cues, such as closed eyes, open mouth, legs spread to reveal the genial area, and nudity or semi nudity, particularly in the areas of breast and genitals (Crane, 1999).   These chest, leg, buttock, and crotch shots increase the stereotypes and images that women are “bodies”, rather than “somebodies” (with personalities) (Hall, Crum, 1994), which ultimately reflects the provocative, exploited images of women in advertising today.   Why? Because society is under the impression that “sex still sells” (Schiller, Landler, and Flynn, 1991).   

Objectification of women in advertising: 
Women are often...
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