Trafficking

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l. s. raheja college of commerce and arts|
Human Trafficking: A Curse|
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Submitted By: |
Roll No: 44|

It’s sad but true: here in this country, people are being bought, sold, and smuggled like modern-day slaves. They are trapped in lives of misery—often beaten, starved, and forced to work as prostitutes or to take grueling jobs as migrant, domestic, restaurant, or factory workers with little or no pay. We’re working hard to stop human trafficking—not only because of the personal and psychological toll it takes on society, but also because it facilitates the illegal movement of immigrants across borders and provides a ready source of income for organized crime groups and even terrorists.|

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to express my special thanks of gratitude to our professor, Ms.Rucha Puntambekar, who gave me the golden opportunity to do this wonderful project on the topic – Human Trafficking: A Curse, which also helped us in doing a lot of research and I have come to know about many new things. I am really thankful to her.

Secondly, I would also like to thank my parents and friends who helped us a lot in finishing this project within the limited time. I am grateful to my sister for helping me in my assignment and a sincere thanks to Chetna Ma’am, my English teacher of Auxilium Convent High School, Baroda. I have made this project not only for the sake of marks but also to highlight the issue at hand.

INDEX

SR.NO| TOPIC| PAGE NO.|
1.| Executive summary| |
2.| Introduction| |
3.| Human Trafficking: The Case| |
4.| Views on Human Trafficking| |
5.| Limitations| |
6.| Conclusion| |
7.| Bibliography| |

EXCECUTIVE SUMMARY

Trafficking is a lucrative industry. It has been identified as the fastest growing criminal industry in the world. It is second only to drug trafficking as the most profitable illegal industry in the world. In 2004, the total annual revenue for trafficking in people was estimated to be between USD$5 billion and $9 billion. Human trafficking differs from people smuggling. In the latter, people voluntarily request or hire an individual, known as a smuggler, to covertly transport them from one location to another. This generally involves transportation from one country to another, where legal entry would be denied upon arrival at the international border. There may be no deception involved in the (illegal) agreement. After entry into the country and arrival at their ultimate destination, the smuggled person is usually free to find their own way. Human traffic is a: "Crime against person – victim; violation of the rights of the victim of trafficking by definition (violation of person’s human rights; victim of coercion and exploitation that give rise to duties by the State to treat the individual as a victim of a crime and human rights violation)" Victims of human trafficking are not permitted to leave upon arrival at their destination. They are held against their will through acts of coercion and forced to work or provide services to the trafficker or others. The work or services may include anything from bonded or forced labor to commercialized sexual exploitation. The arrangement may be structured as a work contract, but with no or low payment or on terms which are highly exploitative. Sometimes the arrangement is structured as debt bondage, with the victim not being permitted or able to pay off the debt.

INTRODUCTION

Human trafficking is one of the most common way people end up in slavery. While the term is increasingly used instead of the word "slavery", this is misleading. The term is often misused when it is confused with human smuggling. The sale, transport and profit from human beings who are forced to work for others -- is the modern equivalent of slavery. Against their will, millions of people around the world are forced to work for the profit of others, for example by begging, prostitution, involuntary servitude,...
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