Traffic Management

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Traffic congestion, Road, Congestion pricing
  • Pages : 12 (3447 words )
  • Download(s) : 219
  • Published : February 12, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview

Time to Evolve: New Concepts in Traffic Management
Dr. Dennis Wilson


Time to Evolve: New Concepts in Traffic Management

Rough Notes

But when congestion makes our business sluggish and chokes billions from the economy, it seems a strange policy - and one the government's own research seems to decry. The first chapter of the Eddington Transport Study, which considered transport's role in sustaining the UK's productivity and competitiveness, and was published in December 2006, says: "A good transport network is important in sustaining economic success in modern economies… The quality of infrastructure, and how comprehensive the transport network is, will influence the role transport plays and its contribution to the functioning of a successful economy." (de Pencier, T., 2008)

Certainly, the waste of man-hours and money resulting from cars and commercial vehicles sitting around in traffic jams, whether in town and city centres or on inter-urban highways, is colossal… and stupid. (de Pencier, T., 2008)

Hence, the call not to wait until 2014 but to attack the problem now. Of course, we must make the best use of the roads we have at present - through widening, better junctions, improved traffic management, better information, and all of the rest. But we need more road capacity sooner rather than later. (de Pencier, T., 2008)


The green lobby may be 'anti-roads', but there' no getting away from the fact they are essential to ensure the UK's trade economy prospers (de Pencier, T., 2008)

The traffic flow data used for modeling are obtained from the inductive loop-detectors embedded in the streets of junction… (Ghosh, B., Basu, B., O'Mahony, M., 2007, p. 181)

Traffic flows were measured using the loop detector mentioned above. If the data obtained was sufficient for the Gosh et al. research if should be sufficient for real-time traffic estimates (DW)

In any transportation network, the implementation of an intelligent transportation system [pic]ITS[?] to provide dynamic traffic control and management requires real-time forecasting of traffic conditions in the near [pic]short-term[?] future. Short-term traffic forecasting prediction horizon less than 1 h, [pic]Smith et al. 2002[?] supports the two most important components of ITS: proactive traffic control required in advanced traffic management systems [pic]ATMS[?] and real-time route guidance required in advanced traveler information systems [pic]ATIS[?]. With the increasing need for developing more efficient ITS based traffic management systems, considerable research attention has been focused on short-term traffic forecasting. An extensive review of this subject has been provided by Vlahogianni et al. 2004[?]. (Ghosh, B., Basu, B., O'Mahony, M., 2007, p. 181)

The well-known short-term forecasting methods can broadly be classified into univariate and multivariate approaches. In the univariate approach, traffic variables [pic]such as speed, flow or occupancy, etc.[?] are modeled utilizing observations from any single site, whereas developing a single model considering several sites for input and output is termed the multivariate approach. (Ghosh, B., Basu, B., O'Mahony, M., 2007, p. 181)

Of all autoregressive linear processes, the autoregressive integrated moving average [pic]ARIMA[?] family of models were first introduced by Ahmed and Cook [pic]1979[?]. (Ghosh, B., Basu, B., O'Mahony, M., 2007, p. 181)

All of these SARIMA models can capture the daily repetitive nature of traffic flow and the dependence of present traffic conditions on the immediate past. (Ghosh, B., Basu, B., O'Mahony, M., 2007, p. 182)

There is no single, broadly accepted definition of traffic congestion. One of the principal reasons for this lack of consensus is that congestion is both (JOINT TRANSPORT RESEARCH...
tracking img