Traffic Jams in Kabul City

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 432
  • Published : September 20, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Name:Mohammad Shakir Mujadidi

Traffic Jams in Kabul City
It is very well known that most developing and under developed countries are facing many of problems. These problems start from a basic issue with individuals to the entire government system. These are often due to bad security conditions, undeveloped infrastructures, and incorrect use of resources. In addition; Afghanistan is one of those developing countries, which is facing similar problems. However, most of countries are helping Afghanistan to its improvement but the government is not paying attention as they should do. As a result, Afghanistan’s most important provinces such as Kabul, Balkh, Heart, and Kandahar are not being developed. Although Kabul is its capital, it faces some difficulties. One of those hardships is traffic jams in Kabul City. If you look to the media of Afghanistan or Kabul City from a higher point, you can measure that traffic jams become a very important issue to people and environment. These traffic jams are due to some causes that till now government is not being able to solve them. The main reasons are growing of population and increasing the number of vehicles, the location of government offices in the middle of the city and officials movements, foreign troop’s movements, and inexperienced drivers.

The most important cause for traffic jams in Kabul City is the day by day increasing in population and vehicles. According to Noorudeen Hamdard, Chief of Kabul Traffic Department “the Kabul roads have been designed and constructed for more than fifty thousand vehicles but currently there are 400 thousand registered vehicles traveling around the city”. When there are eight times more vehicles than it was estimated; as a result, it will bring so many traffic jams in Kabul city. This also means that for every thirteen persons there is one vehicle. Furthermore, according to a population survey of The World Bank in Kabul there were almost three million people living in 2004 in...
tracking img