Tqm Implementation at Suzuki Motors

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TQM IMPLEMENTATION AT PAK SUZUKI MOTORS CO. LTD.

Course: Total Quality Management
Course In charge: Sir Irfan

Submitted by:
Ahtisham Iqbal (07)
Ayesha Hasan (14)
Osama Masood Khan (40)
Rabeel Arif Shaikh (43)
Saira Farooq (52)
Zoheb Hassan Khan (62)
Date: 4th December 2011

S. No| CONTENTS| Pg. No|
1234| Total Quality ManagementPak Suzuki Motor Company LimitedInterview With The Assistant Manager (HR) Of PSMCLAnalysis of TQM At Pak Suzuki Motors Company Limited| 03071013| TABLE OF CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

First of all, we would like to express our deep gratitude to Almighty Allah, who enabled us to undertake such an important task and to study about topic of such importance. We also wish to acknowledge the guidance provided by our teacher Mr. Irfan and we are thankful to Mr. Abdul Rafay Sarfraz who is the Assistant Manager HR in Pak Suzuki Motors Company Limited at Bin Qasim Plant Karachi and entire Pak Suzuki Management. They have provided all the relevant data as well as other information relating to the important independent variables.

TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT
BRIEF HISTORY
The roots of Total Quality Management (TQM) can be traced back to early 1920s when statistical theory was first applied to product quality control. This concept was further developed in Japan in the 40s led by Americans, such as Deming, Juran and Feigenbaum. The focus widened from quality of products to quality of all issues within an organization. After World War II, major Japanese manufacturers converted from producing military goods for internal use to civilian goods for trade, and they got poor response from the world market. Then Japan started exploring new ways of thinking about quality (Deming and Juran). Rather than relying purely on product inspection, total quality focused on improving all organizational processes through the people who used them. Juran, at a conference of the European organization for quality control in Sweden made the following prediction; “The Japanese are headed for world quality leadership and will attain it in the next two decades because no one else is moving at the same pace”. In the 1980s to the 1990s, a new phase of quality control and management began. This became known as Total Quality Management (TQM). Having observed Japan’s success of employing quality issues, western companies started to introduce their own quality initiatives. TQM, developed as a catchall phrase for the broad spectrum of quality-focused strategies, program and techniques during this period, became the centre of focus for the western quality movement. A typical definition of TQM includes phrases such as: customer focus, the involvement of all employees, continuous improvement and the integration of quality management into the total organization. Although the definitions were all similar, there was confusion. It was not clear what sort of practices, policies, and activities needed to be implemented to fit the TQM definition. Some important ingredients of TQM are:

* Leadership
* Customer satisfaction
* Employee involvement
LEADERSHIP
It is possibly the most important element in TQM. It appears everywhere in organization. Leadership in TQM requires the manager to provide an inspiring vision, make strategic directions that are understood by all and to instill values that guide subordinates. For TQM to be successful in the business, the supervisor must be committed in leading his employees. A supervisor must understand TQM, believe in it and then demonstrate their belief and commitment through their daily practices of TQM. The supervisor makes sure that strategies, philosophies, values and goals are transmitted down throughout the organization to provide focus, clarity and direction. A key point is that TQM has to be introduced and led by top management. Commitment and personal involvement is required from top management in creating and deploying...
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