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By: Anne Vilagut

Tourism The French define tourism as "the art to satisfy the most diverse aspirations which invite man to move out of his daily universe." The Webster's dictionary defines tourism as "the guiding or managing of tourists; the promotion or encouragement of touring: the accommodation of tourists." Both definitions are apt for tourism. The private sector of tourism includes lodging, food, transportation, recreation facilities, attractions, travel agents, and tour operators. These in turn are supported by a variety of specialized services, such as research promotion and printing. In the public sector, promotion of tourism on behalf of the state or communities is a major activity. In addition, there is the infrastructure of travel and tourism-such as roads, bridges, and utilities-and the public investment, federal, state in land and a wide range of recreational amenities and facilities. Tourism consists primarily of travel for pleasure purposes. It does not normally involve a large measure of physical exertion, nor does it involve acquisition of new skills. Tourism is oriented to the consumer rather than to the producer, and the economic impact of tourism comes primarily from multiple retail purchases by the tourists in a variety of establishments. The average household spends more on tourism as its real income increase (The National Tourism Resources Review, 1976). The City as a Tourist Resource The City's appeal is based on eight general categories of attractions: Business opportunities, both work and personal; recreation; cultural/educational facilities; contact with people; amusement and entertainment; special events; shops; and atmosphere. The pull of these attractions is in turn affected by five variables; reputation, cost overall quality of the urban environment (of which big-city problems, particularly crime, congestion and inconvenience are a part) locations and climate. The strength of a city' s appeal depends on a combination of some or...
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