Tourism

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Tourism

By | March 2011
Page 1 of 14
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“In spite of many altruistic and well-meaning reasons put forward to support the case for tourism development, it is the economic benefits that provide the main driving force for tourism development.” (Cooper et. al, 2005).

According to the World Tourism Organisation (WTO), tourism is defined as the activities of persons travelling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes. Until, recently it has been a relatively difficult exercise to measure and analyse tourism in a meaningful way. This holds true as travel and tourism is viewed as an industry with no traditional production function, with no uniformly measurable output and no common structure or organisation across countries (OECD Case study, 2002). It revolves around the import of consumers termed as tourists to tourism destinations rather than export of products from production spots to consumers.

The word “tourism” has been derived from the Latin word “TOMOS” and Hebrew word “TORAH”. It has grown to be a popular universal leisure activity. According to the World Travel and Tourism Council, this industry is the one of the highest employers of workforce in the global arena. Apart from offering jobs, this sector means better service to customers, a gateway to economic progress at local and global levels, prospects for enhanced dignity for the citizens and a better livelihood for the people around the world. Tourism is no longer the choice of a few but is an accepted and familiarized part of the lifestyles of a large number of people. It also involves the enthusiasm and experience of the tourists, the expectations of and adjustments made by residents of reception areas and the roles played by various mediums that intercede between them (Wall & Mathieson, 2006).

As stated by the UNWTO “the growth of international tourist arrivals has been on an astounding...