Touch & the Energy Systems

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11
Physical Education
Unit 2, 2012 - Touch & the Energy Systems
Inocentes, Steven

11
Physical Education
Unit 2, 2012 - Touch & the Energy Systems
Inocentes, Steven

Table of Contents
1.0 Introduction____________________________________________________2 2.0 Energy Systems used in touch______________________________________2 3.1 Fatigue and Performance during Touch________________________3 3.0 Recommendations – Tactics / Strategies_____________________________3 4.0 Conclusion ____________________________________________________4 5.0 Reference List__________________________________________________4 Appendices____________________________________________________4

1.0 Introduction

The human body operate on three energy systems: Phosphate Energy System, (ATP/CP or CP SPLITTING), Lactic Acid Energy System (Anaerobic Glycolysis) and Aerobic Energy System (Oxygen System). ATP is when an enzyme splits one of the three phosphate molecules from Adenosine Triphosphate and this releases large amounts of energy that the muscle fibres use to create movement, this turns ATP into Adenosine di-phosphate (ADP), However, only a small amount of ATP is stored within the muscles cells, about 10-15 seconds and takes 2-3 minutes to fully replenish. When ATP is depleted the body turn to anaerobic Glycolysis for energy. This process breaks down glycogen and glucose (Sugar and Fat) to produce energy. This process creates a by-product called ‘pyruvic acid’ which converts into lactic acid if there is insufficient oxygen circulating in the muscles. If Lactic acid accumulates, the process of anaerobic glycolysis slows down, resulting in fatigue. This energy system takes 20-60 minutes depending on the fitness level to remove the accumulated lactic acid after maximal exercise. The third energy system is a much slower process of collecting energy, however; the energy produced lasts longer than the other two energy systems, and therefore it is responsible for providing energy for activities that last longer than three minutes. This process happens through aerobic breathing, where pyruvic acid produced by glycolysis is turned into more energy before it is turned into lactic acid. However, for this process to happen the heart and lungs must deliver enough oxygen for the body to continue supplying energy. As long as the on-board supply of glucose and glycogen (derived from carbohydrates, fat and protein) lasts, aerobic energy system will continue to provide a long lasting energy mechanism. (Unit 2 – Processes & Effects of Training & Exercise)

2.0 Energy Systems used in Touch

In the game of touch, the position of the player determines how much energy is needed and what energy system is available to facilitate the demand. On the heart rate graph of Brown & Green, Brown plays as wing for 15 minutes with his heart rate starting at just above 100 and increasing up to over 150, we can conclude that Brown was having a fairly relaxed time keeping up with the middles. However, just at the end of the 15 minutes it seemed that Brown’s heart rate suddenly spikes to 160 where he might’ve gotten a breakthrough on the side. He was then given 10 minutes of rest before playing in the middle. For 15 minutes in the middle, Browns heart rate had surpassed his heart rate while playing as Wing with several instances where his heart rate had spiked well over 200 where he would’ve made a break through or switched the ball to the side. Greens Graph provides evidence that playing in the middle offer for a higher heart rate (Bpm). This is because the middle is where most of the action happens; the players are constantly going up anaerobically. According to Unit 2 – Processes & Effects of Training & Exercise, 80% of the game at or above anaerobic threshold are in the (middles), 60% at or above anaerobic threshold are in the (links) while 52% at or above anaerobic threshold are in the (Wing). Therefore in...
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