Totalitarianism: a World of Terror (1984)

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Totalitarianism: A World of Terror
Totalitarian is defined as “of or relating to a political regime based on subordination of the individual to the state and strict control of all aspects of the life and productive capacity of the nation especially by coercive measures (as censorship and terrorism) (Totalitarian)”. Through totalitarianism the government is able to completely control its citizens. This can cause everyone to no longer be individuals, no longer be creative, and no longer be imaginative. Orwell saw the dangers of living under totalitarian government, which is why he wrote Nineteen Eighty-four. George Orwell writes Nineteen Eighty-four in the year 1949 because he feared the future world would rule under totalitarianism. He warns society through Nineteen Eighty-four’s characters, themes, and control the Party has on its individuals. The characters in Nineteen Eighty-four are created to show its readers that totalitarianism can again become a serious threat and should not be taken lightly. Winston Smith was the main character in this novel. “The instinctive responsiveness of the body leads Winston to begin his first tentative gestures of resistance in the solitary physical act of writing down his thoughts and experiences in the forbidden journal (Jacobs)”. In the first chapter Winston writes in his diary repeatedly in capital letters “DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER” from here it is clear that Winston will be the one who will fight for his individuality and against the government (Orwell 19). Winston is miserable and wishes life could be like the past where the truth actually exists and cannot be manipulated (Place). The Party is what Oceania, “…a totalitarian state in which the populace is grouped into three classes: the Inner Party (the ruling elite), the Outer Party (the party functionaries), and the proles, the vast, ignorant class of laborers”, calls its government (Burt). “Big Brother, the all-seeing manifestation in 1984 of the Party's drive for power for...
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