Total quality management a literature review

Page 1 of 11

Total quality management a literature review

By | April 2012
Page 1 of 11
Total Quality Management:

Its relevance in today’s marketplace

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

1. TITLE3

2. BACKGROUND5

3. OBJECTIVES5

4. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF RESEARCH6

5. KEY FINDINGS8

6. SUMMARY OF RESEARCH13

7. FUTURE RESEARCH14

8. CONCLUSION

9. REFERENCE LIST

1. Total Quality Management: Standing the test of time

2. Background

This literature review has been completed as part of the MAN5010/MBA5710 unit, Management. This review encompasses opinions and findings contained within a burgeoning body of work that have been published within the last 30 years, and sets out to demonstrate the origins and subsequent development of Total Quality Management (TQM), its definition, the benefits of implementing TQM in the workplace and the associated pitfalls. It also examines the role of ISO 9000 in context to TQM and concludes by offering options for future research.

3. Objectives

4. Brief Description of Research

5. Key Findings

6. Summary of Research

1. Origins of Total Quality Management

Literature suggests that there are 5 separate authors credited with the origins of what we know today as Total Quality Management. They are William E. Deming, Joseph M. Juran, Kaoru Ishikawa, Phillip B. Crosby and Armand V. Feigenbaum. (Krüger, 2001; Tari, 2005).

Deming’s management philosophy contains guidelines in the format of 14 separate points that act as a blueprint to achieve quality management by adopting fitting organisational behaviours. (Rungtusanatham, 1994) Juran is credited with devising the Pareto principle, commonly referred to as the 80-20 rule. The Pareto principle contends that 80% of effects are determined from 20% of causes. (Bunkley, 2008). Ishikawa’s prescribed methodology is of quality control employed company wide. He urges use of the quality circle and goes onto list...