Top Ten Things to Remember When Teaching Primary Students

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Vanessa
 Hamilton
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Hamilton
 1
  Primary
 ABQ
  Lara
 Chebaro-­‐Burrafato
  Tuesday
 July
 17,
 2012
 
  Top
 Ten
 Things
 to
 Remember
 When
 Teaching
 Primary
 Students
 
 
  There
 are
 many
 fun,
 exciting,
 and
 fascinating
 things
 about
 Primary
 children
  assessments.
 
 Aside
 from
 the
 academics,
 a
 sound
 understanding
 of
 child
  development,
 the
 nature
 of
 the
 learner,
 effective
 parent-­‐child-­‐teacher
 interaction,
  and
 even
 the
 manner
 in
 which
 the
 environment
 is
 established,
 both
 physically
 and
  emotionally,
 play
 a
 huge
 role
 in
 the
 success
 for
 in
 the
 environment.
 
 
  The
 following
 are
 the
 top
 ten
 things
 to
 remember
 when
 planning
 and
  teaching
 Primary
 learners:
 
  1.
 Developmental
 Readiness
 and
 Learning
 Theories
 of
 Child
 Development.
 
  This
 is
 perhaps
 the
 most
 important
 element
 of
 Primary
 teaching
 and
 curriculum
  design.
 
 Without
 a
 sound
 understanding
 of
 childhood
 development
 and
 the
  developmental
 readiness
 of
 children,
 it
 would
 be
 next
 to
 impossible
 to
 effectively
  fulfill
 all
 of
 the
 aspects
 and
 expectations
 of
 the
 teacher-­‐student
 relationship.
 
 It
 is
  essential
 to
 understand
 the
 variances
 in
 physical,
 cognitive,
 emotional,
 social,
 and
  language
 development
 as
 a
 child
 grows
 and
 develops
 as
 often
 these
 changes
 can
 be
  either
 obvious
 or
 subtle,
 and
 can
 happen
 intrinsically
 or
 extrinsically.
 
 
 
  Ensuring
 that
 a
 child
 is
 ready
 and
 able
 to
 learn
 concepts,
 perform
 movements,
 and
  begin
 to
 think
 critically
 allows
 the
 teacher
 opportunities
 to
 present
 material
 and
  learning
 moments
 at
 times
 when
 the
 student
 is
 most
 likely
 to
 be
 able
 to
 explore
 and
  succeed.
 
 The
 same
 understanding
 of
 cognitive,
 social,
 and
 emotional
 development
  affords
 the
 teacher
 some
 understanding
 of
 when
 he
 or
 she
 should
 intervene
 in
 child
  conflict,
 or
 when
 they
 should
 step
 back
 and
 allow
 the
 children
 to
 figure
 the
 issue
 out
  for
 themselves.
 
 Constructivist,
 Developmental,
 Psychodynamic,
 Maturationist,
 and
  Ecological
 theories
 of
 development
 and
 educational
 approach
 all
 offer
 insight
 into
  the
 type
 of
 learning
 opportunities
 and
 environments
 we
 should
 consider
 providing
  for
 our
 students,
 as
 well
 as
 the
 impact
 the
 surrounding
 environment
 and
 their
  homes
 lives
 have
 on
 their
 ability
 to
 learn,
 problem
 solve,
 self-­‐regulate,
 and
 socialize.
 
 
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