Top Crystal Brands

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  • Topic: Glass, Glass art, Glassmaking companies
  • Pages : 8 (2862 words )
  • Download(s) : 325
  • Published : April 2, 2011
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[pic]homeshopping - 3 years ago
René Lalique became synonymous with French Art Nouveau decorative arts. René Lalique was born in 1860 and first began designing fine jewelry in Paris in 1881. Lalique pursued increasingly more innovative experimentation in glass commencing around 1883. Early works used the familiar "lost wax" technique by which the model is made in wax while a mold is formed around the model. Then, the wax is melted and molten glass is poured into the mold. Lalique glass was made in this manner until approximately 1905 at which time the factory was redesigned for a larger production. As such, the individual uniqueness of each example of Lalique glass came to an end with the end of the one-time only molding technique around wax models. The success of this venture resulted in the opening of his own glassworks at Combs-la-Ville in 1909. During the art nouveau period, Lalique was well known for a wide variety of objects including perfume bottles, vases, inkwells, decorative boxes, and bookends.  In 1921 a larger factory was established at Wingen-sur-Moder in Alsace-Lorraine. By the '30s Lalique was world renowned as the most important designer of his time.

Lalique glass is lead based, either mold blown or pressed. Favored motifs during the Art Nouveau period were dancing nymphs, fish, dragonflies, and foliage. Characteristically the glass is crystal in combination with acid-etched relief. Later some items were made in as many as ten colors (red, amber, and green among them) and were occasionally accented with enameling. These colored pieces, especially those in, black, are highly prized by advanced collectors. During the '20s and '30s, Lalique designed several vases and bowls reminiscent of American Indian art. He also developed a line in the Art Deco style decorated with stylized birds, florals, and geometries. In addition to vases, clocks, automobile mascots, stemware, and bottles, many other useful objects were produced. While not well known, Lalique also experimented with bronze and other materials as well. Most glass was clear or opalescent glass and signed via engraving or in the mold "R. Lalique". The R. Lalique signature was only used until 1945 with the death of René. At that time, René Lalique's son Marc took over the company. Production of many pieces produced prior to 1945 ceased following René's death although some are still in production albeit with a different marking. The firm is still in operation today. MORE
[pic]homeshopping - 3 years ago
The road to Orrefors winds through deep forests of spruce that open suddenly on darkly glistening lakes, and meadows and farmhouses set behind stonewalls. Here are the elements that gave rise to glassblowing, and which are reflected today in the finished glass; the ripples across the water, the sunbeams that penetrate the tall, dense stands of spruce, and the crystal-clear air. It is hardly surprising that the glass created here is beloved all over the world. The Swedish glass industry was born about 250 years ago, not far from Orrefors - only about 20 kilometers as the crow flies. In the summer of 1742 the first glassworks, warehouse, potash furnace and smithy were inaugurated in which is now the small village of Kosta. Orrefors' international breakthrough came at the Paris Exhibition of 1925. From the Hotel de Ville, the Town Hall of Paris, the Swedish pavilion borrowed a magnificent glass goblet designed by Simon Gate that had been presented as a gift to the City of Paris from the City of Stockholm in 1922. The goblet became a sensation, and the prestigious Grand Prix award was given to Orrefors and its designers. The glassblowers and engravers received gold medals. Many of the imposing glas objects from Orrefors were created for special occasions, or to special order. The motifs in the engraved glass of that period may seem somewhat...
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