Top 10 First Aid Treatment

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FIRST AID
Animal Bites Treatment
1. Stop Bleeding
* Apply direct pressure until bleeding stops.
2. Clean and Protect
For a wound or superficial scratch from an animal bite:
* Gently clean with soap and warm water. Rinse for several minutes after cleaning. * Apply antibiotic cream to reduce risk of infection, and cover with a sterile bandage. 3. Get Help
* Get medical help immediately for any animal bite that is more than a superficial scratch or if the animal was a wild animal or stray, regardless of the severity of the injury. * If the animal's owner is available, find out if the animal's rabies shots are up-to-date. Give this information to your health care provider. Thermal Burns Treatment

For All Burns
1. Stop Burning Immediately
* Put out fire or stop the person's contact with hot liquid, steam, or other material. * Help the person "stop, drop, and roll" to smother flames. * Remove smoldering material from the person.

* Remove hot or burned clothing. If clothing sticks to skin, cut or tear around it. 2. Remove Constrictive Clothing Immediately
* Take off jewelry, belts, and tight clothing. Burns can swell quickly. Then take the following steps.
For First-Degree Burns (Affecting Top Layer of Skin)
1. Cool Burn
* Hold burned skin under cool (not cold) running water or immerse in cool water until pain subsides. * Use compresses if running water isn’t available.
2. Protect Burn
* Cover with sterile, non-adhesive bandage or clean cloth. * Do not apply butter or ointments, which can cause infection. 3. Treat Pain
* Give over-the-counter pain reliever such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or naproxen (Aleve). Choking Treatment
If the Person Is Conscious but Not Able to Breathe or Talk:
1. Give Back Blows
* Give up to 5 blows between the shoulder blades with the heel of your hand. 2. If Person Is Still Choking, Do Thrusts
If the person is not pregnant or obese, do abdominal thrusts: * Stand behind the person and wrap your arms around the waist. * Place your clenched fist just above the person’s navel. Grab your fist with your other hand. * Quickly pull inward and upward.

* Continue cycles of 5 back blows and 5 abdominal thrusts until the object is coughed up or the person starts to breathe or cough. * Take the object out of his mouth only if you can see it. Never do a finger sweep unless you can see the object in the person's mouth. If the person is obese or pregnant, do high abdominal thrusts: * Stand behind the person, wrap your arms them, and position your hands at the base of the breast bone. * Quickly pull inward and upward.

* Repeat until the object is dislodged.
3. Give CPR, if Necessary
If the obstruction comes out, but the person is not breathing or if the person becomes unconscious: For a child-
1. Check to see if the child is conscious.
* Make sure you and the child are in safe surroundings.
* Tap the child gently.
* Shout, “Are you OK?"
* Look quickly to see if the child has any injuries or medical problems. 2. Check Breathing
* Place your ear near the child’s mouth and nose. Is there breath on your cheek? Is the child’s chest moving? 3. Begin Chest Compressions
If the child doesn’t respond and isn’t breathing:
* Carefully place child on back. For a baby, be careful not to tilt the head back too far. If you suspect a neck or head injury, roll baby over, moving entire body at once. * For a baby, place two fingers on breastbone, For a child, place heel of one hand on center of chest at nipple line. You also can push with one hand on top of the other. * For a child, press down about 2 inches. Make sure not to press on ribs. * For a baby, press down about 1 1/2 inches, about 1/3 to 1/2 the depth of chest. Make sure not to press on the end of the breastbone. * Do 30 chest compressions, at the rate of 100 per minute. Let the chest rise completely between pushes....
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