Toilet Paper - Speech

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Ever have one of those days, you're sitting on the toilet doing your business and you reach for the toilet paper and find to the right of empty roll, and suddenly you feel a ship wreck without a paddle. Something that you took for granted every day is now the factor between you and your business. Toilet Paper. Everybody in America uses toilet paper and if you don't, same on you. During Halloween, I'm sure many of you planned, seen, or was in the act of TP-ing someone's house, or that you've always wanted to wrap your annoying little cousins in toilet paper and throw them in the closet. Now, besides from all the pranks. Toilet paper is an American culture. In most countries besides the US doesn't carry toilet paper in their public bathrooms as a standard. Toilet paper is so important in our daily lives that I have took the liberty to research about it. Today, I am here to inform you of what people used prior to toilet paper, statistic facts, and what the future of toilet paper can bring us.

First of all, what did we use before toilet paper? Can you imagine something so vital didn't even exist until the 14th century, and in America didn't show up until the late 1800s!!?? So what did we use prior to toilet paper? Any guesses? Well, imagination can just take over at this point. Grass, leaves, sticks, sponges, linen, or even their left hand. Oh yeah, you name it. Lets go back, according a research site called “The history of toilet paper,” "Official" toilet paper - that is, paper which was produced specifically for the purpose of cleaning our behinds - dates back to the late 14th Century, when the Chinese produced it for royalty ordered it in 2x3foot sheets. Pages torn from newspapers and magazines were commonly used in the early American West. Toilet paper was not always perfect like today's toilet paper. In 1935, Northern Tissue advertised "splinter-free" toilet paper. Early paper production techniques sometimes left splinters embedded in the paper....
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