To What Degree Does Sancho Panza Share in Don Quixote's Delusions?

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  • Topic: Don Quixote, Sancho Panza, Miguel de Cervantes
  • Pages : 1 (270 words )
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  • Published : November 28, 2011
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To what degree does Sancho Panza share in Don Quixote’s delusions?

Sancho Panza is a peasant who follows Don Quixote out greed, and some loyalty. For instance the time when Quixote runs after the magicians to fight them in battle, (he is really fighting with friars), Sancho tries to rob the friar and take his robe. (Page 1702) Only to get a well deserved beating. Although Sancho sometimes just simple warns his master to avoid trouble. When Quixote mistakes windmills for giants. He tells him, no those are just windmills. (Page 1701) Sancho is able to live in both worlds, reality and fantasy. It is whatever suits him at the right time or occasion. He takes the good and the bad of both the current time and the far gone days of chivalry. He displays the faults that most of the sane characters in the novel exhibit but has an underlying sympathetic and honorable characteristics that the others mainly lack. Sancho does not share Don Quixote’s maddening belief in chivalrous virtues nor any of his other delusions. He watches and thinks about Don Quixote, maybe for amusement or curiosity. Sancho humanizes the story, bringing some dignity, but also humor and compassion. Sancho gives us all a chance to imagine ourselves right there with the mad man, wouldn’t you ride along with him for the adventure too? And unless you’re the wealthy Duke and Duchess you might even find yourself wondering what will I get out of all of this? Yet he does care for him enough not to want to see him get hurt either.
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