To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

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Sylvia Collier
Mrs. Voran
Sophomore English
6th hour
3-10-13

““Remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something, and I asked Miss Maudie about it. “Your father’s right,” She said. “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy . . . but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” “Why not kill a mockingbird? Why kill it? These small descriptions are what make the small picture that gets you hooked and helps describe the setting. In the story To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee uses a mockingbird to symbolize innocence combined with details that describe how it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird which persuades the reader to think about why a mockingbird and to picture how it is to live in a small town. In the beginning of the book the author starts out with Scout as narrator showing how she grew up in a small town that’s quite and not a lot goes on but, small town settings, as seen in Macomb, Alabama, are constructed by emphasizing how old the town is or what goes on, on the inside. Like when scout talks about Macomb in the first chapter. “Macomb was an old town, but it was a tired old town when I first knew it. IN rainy weather the streets turned to red slop... [s]omehow it was hotter then . . . bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square. Men’s stiff collards were wilted by nine in the morning. Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps, and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum . . . . There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go, nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boundaries of Maycomb County. But it was a time of vague optimism for some people: Maycomb County had recently been told that it had nothing to fear but fear itself.” The author helps the reader realize the racial division in...
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