To Kill A Mockingbird and Chapter

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Week 1

Introducing

“To Kill A Mockingbird”

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By the end of this week students should be able to:

• Complete a journal entry of their understanding of the novel.

To Kill A Mockingbird

The main text for study this semester is To Kill a Mockingbird, a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. The novel is loosely based on the author's observations of her family and neighbours, as well as an event that occurred near her hometown when she was 10 years old.

Lee's novel is widely taught in schools in English speaking countries with lessons that tie into tolerance and prejudice. The novel addresses themes such as courage, racial injustice, the death of innocence, tragedy, and coming of age, set against a backdrop of life in the Deep South.

The character of Atticus Finch, the narrator's father, has served as a moral hero for many readers, and a singular model of integrity for lawyers. One writer noted its impact in saying, "In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist, Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism."

To Kill a Mockingbird has proven to be not only an extraordinarily influential book, but a controversial one as well. Initially perceived as a novel addressing racial justice, To Kill a Mockingbird has been the target of various campaigns to have it removed from public classrooms, often for its use of racial epithets.

Reading Goals and Workbook
Before delving into the book make yourself regular reading goals. These will help you stay motivated with your reading and not forget any characters or important details! Two or three chapters a day or 30 minutes of reading each day is an excellent start.

Also know your “peak time”. People work best at different times of the day, and only you know when you work most efficiently. Figure out when you seem to be more focused and organise your reading around that!

This semester you will also be keeping a workbook (word document or exercise book); which you will be submitting at the end of the semester. There will be certain tasks we will be asking you to complete in your workbook and which you can post in My Online Journal in Janison if you wish to share these with other students.

You should use your workbook as a tool to jot down your initial responses to topics, your reflections on particular ideas and so on. You can review and reflect upon your weekly work in your workbook. This is similar to the weekly reflections you completed at the end of each week in semester 1. You can also use your workbook to build up your English vocabulary. Every time you come across an unknown or unfamiliar word jot it down in your workbook and then work out its definition.

If you choose to post some of your reflections online, you will find instructions on how to do this on pages 9-10. However, be mindful that if you choose to post your reflections online it will be accessible by other students and teachers. Therefore, if you do not wish to share your personal thoughts/reflections with others then you should not post these online. Instead it would be best to use a workbook (word document or exercise book) to store these reflections, and only post the required ‘Journal’ tasks online

To Kill A Mockingbird Guide

To Kill A Mockingbird is a great read!

It is divided into two parts and comprises a total of thirty-one chapters.

Part one introduces us to Maycomb and its inhabitants and the three major storylines in the novel: ← Scout’s experiences growing up
← the mystery of Boo Radley
← the Tom Robinson case.

In Part two the racism in their community is revealed to the children through the trial of Tom Robinson. They learn about the positive and negative sides to human nature and solve the mystery of Boo Radley.

Below and over the next few pages are...
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