To Kill a Mockingbird

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To Kill a Mockingbird

By | Feb. 2013
Page 1 of 4
The novel, “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee, like many others of its genre is strongly influenced by the ideas of its author. With this book, Lee has represented her commentaries with symbols or metaphors– although these can sometimes be overlooked too easily in a lengthy novel. The characters she has employed to convey or be subjected to these ideas are referred to as, “the mockingbirds” of the book. Her ideas of who they are and how they should be treated are manifested in this lesson to the children: Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don’t nest in corncribs; they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird (Miss Maude, pg.15).” I have chosen to discourse on the mockingbirds: Scout, Boo, and Tom because they best represent the title, “To Kill a Mockingbird”. These mockingbirds are not the same age or alike in appearances, nor do they lead the same lives; the only thing in common between them is that they are all innocent and have all been harmed by society to a certain degree. Had I selected characters that were only innocent (i.e. Dill) — though still deserving of the title of ‘mockingbird’, their presence would not fulfill the task of explaining the title’s relation to the whole book. The character, Scout is one of the less obvious mockingbirds because her troubles are of a lesser degree than her two counterparts. For Scout, the factors at play that led to her being ostracized by her former group of friends (Jem and Dill) were inevitable. To put it simply, she was ostracized because she is a girl and the boys around her had reached a certain age in which their views towards her had changed. According to some behavioral studies of children, it is pre-adolescent groups which are generally homogenous (members of the same sex), which differ from the behavioral patterns of the children in the book who had just begun to exclude Scout during their adolescence. In theory,...