To Kill a Mocking Bird Analysed

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Racism has been around for a while now and even though its getting better compared to the previous decades it still a big problem we are still dealing with. Ever since every race has met each other there are people from all races that don’t like each other mainly because they are not the same think they are unclean it could even be they have had bad encounters with that particular race and tend yell racist words at them. Not only words have been blurted out its even resulted in beating, rape or death. Its not nice being called “white trash, gook, Muzzie or nigger despite any race there is a term for any race that is offensive and stereotypical. This film has mainly been involved dealing with racism I have compared two films dealing with the situation in different ways.

The first film being analysed is ‘To Kill a Mocking bird’. The film's young protagonists, Scout and her brother Jem live in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, during the 1930s. The story covers three years, during which Scout and Jem undergo changes in their lives. They begin as innocent children, who spend their days happily playing games with each other and spying on the town bogeyman. Through their father's (Gregory Peck) work as a lawyer, taking up the case of defending a man who is coloured Tom Robinson being charged with raping Bob Ewell daughter, Bob Ewell feel sorry for Atticus for defending a black man but he believes in equal treatment no matter what colour. Scout and Jem begin to learn of the racism and evil prevalent in their town, and painfully mature as they are exposed to it.

The second film being analysed is “Gran Torino” A racist Korean War veteran living in a crime-ridden Detroit neighborhood is forced to confront his own lingering prejudice when a troubled Hmong teen from his neighborhood attempts to steal his prized Gran Torino. Decades after the Korean War has ended, ageing veteran Walt Kowalski (Clint Eastwood) is still haunted by the horrors he witnessed on the battlefield. The two objects that matter most to Kowalski in life are the classic Gran Torino that represents his happier days working in a Ford assembly plant, and the M-1 rifle that saved his life countless times during combat. When Kowalski's teenage neighbor attempts to steal his Gran Torino as part of a gang initiation rite, the old man manages to catch the aspiring thief at the business end of his well-maintained semi-automatic rifle. Later, due to the pride of the Asian group, the boy is forced to return to Kowalski's house and perform an act of penance. Despite the fact that Kowalski wants nothing to do with the young troublemaker, he realizes that the quickest way out of the situation is to simply cooperate. In an effort to set the teen on the right path in life and toughen him up, the reluctant vet sets him up with an old crony who now works in construction. In the process, Kowalski discovers that the only way to lay his many painful memories to rest is to finally face his own blinding prejudice head-on.

Treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favour of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class, or category to which that person or thing belongs rather than on individual merit. (Dictionary /discrimination) Discrimination can happen in many ways such as verbally; physical it can even lead to such things as killing or rape.

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-Tom Robinson trail

In To Kill a Mockingbird discrimination is shown when the trail takes place as Tom Robinson is accused as raping a helpless women but as you can see all of the evidence is showing he is innocent the community still states he is guilty only because his black a lot of them don’t admitted it and yet he seemed to kill himself thanks to the community disliking black people.

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-Walter dislike towards the Asian people
-stereotyping Christians

In Gran Torino discriminate is shown when Walter is cleaning his drive...
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