To Kill a Mocking Bird

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Law’s are made for many different reasons, they are made to keep society in place, they are made to give justice to everyone, they are made to give equality to all, they are made to stop intolerable acts, and they are made to uphold our strict justice system. When it comes to practicing law I believe that no exceptions may be made in any circumstances because a rule is a rule. With one exception being made many people would be at a disadvantage, creating an unfair justice system.

Pretend you are a driving your child to their doctor’s appointment, when you realize that you may be late you begin to speed. Eventually you are going 50 miles per hour on a 35 miles per hour road and you run a red light. The police eventually pull you over, and you explain to them your delema. Instead of being understanding and thoughtful of your situation the police officer charges you with both a ticket for speeding and running a red light. Acording to the law this is the right thing to do but according to Atticus, in To Kill A Mokingbird, the policie officer should have accepted your reasoning and allowed you to go free of charge because “sometimes it is better to bend the law a little in special cases.” (30)

I disagree with Atticus because stretching the law in minor casing may seem understandable but laws are made for certain reason’s and when there is an exception made for one person there should be an exception made for any person who breaks the law. Much like in chapter 3 of To Kill A Mockingbird. The Ewell family is a family of much lower social ranking and class that the Cunninham’s. Burris Ewell proves this to be true when he arrives to school with worms attactched to his body and lice in his head, and no shoes on (further explain)
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