Tintern Abbey

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Wordsworth’s poem “Tintern Abbey” is generally read as a descriptive poem of the physical landscape as well as the poet’s life. This essay will show how “Tintern Abbey” exhibits the key romantic themes of, romantic pantheism, individual subjectivity and the historical period. One of the key themes of Romanticism is romantic pantheism that is defined as nature, ”having its own spiritual essence that could be destroyed by human society, but which also offered humanity a restorative power.[and] The belief that God is present as a spiritual power within nature rather than separate from it”(Dixon 2). The poem starts with a description of the scene, that is what at first the poem appears to solely be about, but at the same time keeps the reader at a distance and dose not involves them. Then by the description of orchards reduced to tufts and hedgerows to ‘little lines of sportive wood run wild’, the focus is no longer the landscape but his memory and the connection and feelings of his previous visit to the area. But oft, in lonely rooms, and mid the din Of towns and cities, I have owed to them, In hours of weariness, sensations sweet, Felt in the blood, and felt along the heart; And passing even into my purer mind, With tranquil restoration. In this verse Wordsworth is clearly comparing the city and towns that he has visited while away from nature on his travels, as lonely and disconnected, while his memory of Tintern Abbey has...
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