Tintern Abbey

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 186
  • Published : October 8, 1999
Open Document
Text Preview
William Wordsworth existed in a time when society and its functions were beginning to rapidly pick up. The poem that he “Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye…” gave him a chance to reflect upon his quick paced life by taking a moment to slow down and absorb the beauty of nature that allows one to “see into the life of things” (line 49). Wordsworth’s “Tintern Abbey” takes you on a series of emotional states by trying to sway “readers and himself, that the loss of innocence and intensity over time is compensated by an accumulation of knowledge and insight.” Wordsworth accomplishes to prove that although time was lost along with his innocence, he in turn was able to gain an appreciation for the aesthetics that consoled him by incorporating all together, the wonders of nature, his past experiences, and his present mature perception of life. Wordsworth begins his poem by describing the landscape of the abbey as unchanged during the past five years. He emphasizes the lapse of time by stating, “ again I hear”, “again do I behold”, and “again I see”. He seemed to be overwhelmed with emotions that he, though up on a very far away cliff, was certain that a hermit was in his cave sitting by the fire alone. Wordsworth wanted so much to remember the place that he was allowing his perception of the past take over his present reality. More importantly he says, “I again repose here…” to express that the scene gives him a sense of reconciliation. He further illustrates the isolation, peacefulness, and greenness of the abbey to tap into his vague memories of past encounters. Although there had been a “long absence” from the abbey, the memories of his hurried time in the Wye had consoled him “ ‘mid the din of towns and cities” (lines 26-27). “With tranquil restoration”...
tracking img