Time Management

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 1301
  • Published : April 19, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
TIME MANAGEMENT AMONG STUDENTS IN TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS CHAPTER ONE 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY
For many college students, one of the biggest differences between senior high school and the tertiary is the need to effectively manage your own time. The leap from senior high school system to that of the tertiary is viewed as very significant and also comes with certain liberties. If you began learning time management skills in senior high school, you have a definite advantage over many college students. Therefore the need to practice effective and efficient time management is very essential. According to Stephen R. Covey (1994) Time management is the act or process of exercising conscious control over the amount of time spent on specific activities, especially to increase efficiency or productivity. Time management may be aided by a range of skills, tools, and techniques used to manage time when accomplishing specific tasks, projects and goals. This set encompasses a wide scope of activities, and these include planning, allocating, setting goals, delegation, analysis of time spent, monitoring, organizing, scheduling, and prioritizing. He further asserts that a time management system is a designed combination of processes, tools, techniques, and methods and that usually time management is a necessity in any project development (or activity) as it determines the project completion time and scope. In the tertiary system of education, the atmosphere is relaxed as compared to that of the senior high school system. They may be engaged in a lot of out of school activities and also must learn to balance their time between attending lectures, time for friends and family and also personal stuff that they need to do themselves. With all these going on in the tertiary environment it is possible for students to mismanage their times and as such this mismanagement of their time might go negatively against the student. Since there is that laxity in the tertiary environment one has to efficiently manage their times to be at the helm of affairs in whatever endeavor they participate in. According to Morgenstern, Julie (2004) the key to effective time management is literally being your own boss. Instead of being accountable to teachers and parents, one needs to be accountable to themselves and that one of the biggest stumbling blocks to time management is procrastination. In other to overcome this stumbling block there must be in place certain time management strategies. Time management strategies are often associated with the recommendation to set personal goals. These goals are recorded and may be broken down into a project, an action plan, or a simple task list. For individual tasks or for goals, an importance rating may be established, deadlines may be set, and priorities assigned. This process results in a plan with a task list or a schedule or calendar of activities. Time management also covers how to eliminate tasks that don't provide the individual value. The creation of a task list is one way of managing time efficiently. A task list (also to-do list or things-to-do) is a list of tasks to be completed, such as chores or steps toward completing a project or study activity. It is an inventory tool which serves as an alternative or supplement to memory. Task lists are used in a lot of scenarios; they include self-management, grocery lists, business management, project management, and software development. When one of the items on a task list is accomplished, the task is checked or crossed off. The traditional method is to write these on a piece of paper with a pen or pencil, usually on a note pad or clip-board. Task lists are often prioritized. An early advocate of "ABC" prioritization was Alan Lakein. In his system "A" items were the most important ("A-1" the most important within that group), "B" next most important, "C" least important....
tracking img