Three Strikes Law

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 114
  • Published : June 25, 2006
Open Document
Text Preview
In 1993, Washington passed the first "Three Strikes Law" it mandates long prison sentences (25 years to life) for people who have been convicted of a felony three times on separate occasions. Now, 24 states have adopted similar if not the same laws in the past 10 years. There are many views on this topic that are fair as well as unjust.

California is probably the most recognized state with this law being that they are probably the toughest. Most of California's third strikers are usually over the age of 29 years old being it basically targets older defendants with a history of violent crimes. This law is probably the biggest topic in the jails because these criminals know what is going to happen to them if they commit again, and they usually don't like that. California not only sentences for felonies but also for petty crimes as well. California must be doing something right because from the years 1993- 2000 the crime rate has dropped more than 25 percent. A lot of people have different views on this topic. Some feel this law is unjust and some feel that what California and the other 24 states are doing is a very good way to control crime. Some cons on this issue that people have spoke are: The law destroys the flexibility of the courts and the judge everyone is their own person and each crime is different. A one size fits all system of judgment destroys the flexibility. Another is that it is unjust in certain conditions. There is always going to be that one eighteen year old who is caught stealing videos or pizza whatever it maybe before he is actually even old enough to realize hey, this is wrong, and even having that one young adult who just happened to be at the wrong place at the wrong time. Yes committing these crimes is wrong but twenty-five years to life for these crimes plus the sentencing for the first two offenses, is a little to much for a young adult. And last but not least all of the overcrowding in prisons and the expense to keep it going. It...
tracking img