Thomas Pain Common Sense

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  • Topic: United States Declaration of Independence, American Revolution, Thomas Paine
  • Pages : 3 (798 words )
  • Download(s) : 140
  • Published : April 10, 2013
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Thomas Paine “Common Sense”
Abby Wulfekotte
Ocean County College

America was founded by the British but rapidly evolved into their own. As they evolved many began to notice that they could self-govern themselves and no longer needed aid from Britain. In fact without British aid they believed they could further their relations internationally and form allies (Paine, 1776). Two well-known documents, Common Sense and The Declaration of Independence created hope among colonists, and are believed to be factors in the Independence of America. Although these documents were similar their delivery and purpose were not. Common Sense sought complete separation while The Declaration of Independence still hoped to keep Great Britain as an ally (U.S. History, 2011 Para 1). Common Sense was an instant best-seller. Published in January 1776 in Philadelphia, nearly 120,000 copies were in circulation by April of that year. Paine's brilliant arguments were straightforward. He argued for two main points: (1) independence from England and (2) the creation of a democratic republic (U.S. History, 2011 Para 4). Common sense was very straight forward; it brought out points from many different angles making it understandable to a wide range of people. This is the kind of deliverance Paine went for; he approached his audience from a biblical stand point addressing the issues from all religions. Many viewed Paine as an extremist but his points did give the proper push.

One of his main arguments that stood out to me was that having a King ruler was against Gods wishes. God did not wish to have one man rule all (Paine, 1776). Paine insists that people need rules and to have a government but he argues that the kind of government people need is one created by the people for the people (1776). The power in a Monarchy is too much power and people tend to take advantage. Paine urges the colonists to separate themselves from Great Britain; he argues that the colonists will be better off...
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