Thesis Paper

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Start your paper/ response/ thesis with a grabbing introduction sentence that immediately tells me what this is all about and makes me want to read further. Something such as: Depression is the most common psychological disorder; Media influences are often blamed for aggressive behavior seen in children; or Mirror neurons are a fascinating, fairly new discovery made by scientist. Then spend the rest of the first paragraph briefly outlining the rest of the paper, or introducing the topic. Expand on that first sentence but just a bit. For responses it makes sense to introduce the article here in the first paragraph, i.e. has a sentence such as: Ilze Nix in 2010 published the article How to write a paper (take notice that using the title of something within your text requires you to point this out to the reader by changing the format some), which describes the process in easy terms. If you’re doing a positional paper be sure to give your position here i.e. I, the writer, fully support this notion that the media is causing our youth to be more aggressive. Give a final sentence that directs the reader as to where this paper is going for example: The following paragraphs will discuss some of the research findings supporting that media influences behavior; or The remainder of this paper will briefly discuss some of the major treatment modalities for depression.

Next comes the ‘meat and bones’ of the paper. This part can be one, two, three or a great many more paragraphs depending on the length of the paper and how much you need to say. Try keeping thoughts that relate in one paragraph. A paper on depression might have 3 paragraphs here, one about the symptoms of depression, one about the treatment and one about the etiology. A positional paper might have two paragraphs, one

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outlining research or anecdotal material that supports your position and another that opposes it. A response paper will likely summarize the article in the first paragraph, answer any specific questions in the second paragraph and give a critique, i.e. at least one good and one bad thing about the article, in a third paragraph. It is important to reference throughout the paper! APA format is tricky yet there are always examples of how this is down in psychology textbooks. Within the paper such as here, one would hardly ever use the author’s full name, instead your sentence might read: Nix (2011) states that full names are not used in text. You will always have a date with an author’s last name. When paragraphing, i.e. not retyping word for word, but rather restating in my own words the thoughts of another, you will reference by merely pointing the reader in the original sources direction. At the end of the sentence, or sometimes paragraph you add in parentheses who you got the thought from. (Nix, 2011) When you actually use a direct quote of the exact words as stated or printed by another you need to give more credit. Remember to put the quote in “quotation marks like this” and at the end have a reference that includes the page number! (Nix, 2011, p. 5) It is by extreme exception that the title of a book, or website address will be used IN TEXT as a reference. Stick to using the author’s last name and date of publication and you will be just fine at this level. Be sure to look at what happens when the source has more than one author (Nix & Nix, 2011) or (Nix, Nix, and Nix, 2011). One may only use the et al. (Nix et al., 2011) abbreviation if there are more than 3 authors AND the first item you mentioned these authors you included ALL the last names! RUNNING HEADPage #

Last paragraph should always be some conclusion. This need not be very long; it could only be one or two sentences. It is important however to bring it all together for the reader and give some...
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