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Thesis

Page 1 of 18
Malnutrition

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the
Requirements in English IV
San Juan National High School
San Juan, La Union

By:
Joel Acosta
IV-Rizal

Presented to:
Mrs. Cleofe O. Normand

Table of Contents
CHAPTER 1
Introduction1
Statement of the Problem3
Significance of the study3
Scope and Delimitation3
CHAPTER 2
Methodology4
Definition of Terms4
CHAPTER 3
I. Causes of Malnutrition5
II. Ways to Prevent Malnutrition6
III. Strategies to Detect and Prevent Malnutrition in the Elderly7
IV. Government Projects to Solve Malnutrition10
V. Sign and Symptoms of Malnutrition11
VI. Forms of Malnutrition12
CHAPTER 4
Summary15
Conclusion15
Recommendation15
Bibliography16

ii
Introduction
Malnutrition is a dietary condition caused by a deficiency or excess of one or more essential nutrients in the diet. Malnutrition is characterized by a wide array of health problems, including extreme weight loss, stunted growth, weakened resistance to infection, and impairment of intellect. Severe case of malnutrition can lead to death.

Children suffer from the effects of starvation more quickly than adults. According to the United Nations children’s Fund (UNICEF), malnutrition contributed to the deaths of more than 6 million children under age five each year. Typically, starving children develop a condition called protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). The two most common forms of PEM, marasmus and kwashiorkor, occur in all developing countries and are life-threatening conditions; Marasmus occurs when a child is weaned earlier that normal and receiver food low in nutrients. The child may also suffer repeated infections, such as gastroenteritis, due to poor hygiene. A child with marasmus is very underweight, with no body fat and wasted muscles. Kwashiorkor occurs when a child is weaned later that...