There Will Come Soft Rains

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In Bradbury’s story, There Will Come Soft Rains, he personifies many objects in the house. He described the cleaning animals as having eyes and sucking at dust. He personified the clock as being afraid that no one would hear it. At one point he describes the house as being self protective and bordering on paranoia. The door also recognized the dog’s voice. By giving the house and all of its machines a personality, he makes the house appear to be the main character. Bradbury gives many examples of how technology can be both helpful and dangerous to human beings. The stove made food and saved time for the family, but when there was no one there it continued to cook and make food. The house continued to use water when it wasn’t needed because it had been programmed to do so, and then when it was needed the reserve water supply was gone. Technology made the house able to clean itself and take care of the family yet advances in technology destroyed the family. When you compare Bradbury’s vision to the modern world it seems very believable. When Bradbury wrote this story, the world was not computerized. Bradbury foresaw a talking reminder of the date, time, and other important things before the technology ever existed. Today we have many machines and gadgets that can do the same. The house had many programmable devises and functions like the cleaning robot mice. Today we have computerized robotic car washes, vacuum cleaners and programmable cooking devices. The children’s room was programmed for entertainment. In the rooms of today’s children we find electronic games, television and other programmable accessories. Time has shown that, in many ways, Bradbury’s vision of the future has come to pass.
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