Theory of the Classical Approach

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In the late 1800’s, when Fredrick Taylor came up with the theory of the classical approach as a solution for the national productivity problem, he had based his approach on three things. First, management wasn’t really aware of how much work could be completed by the laborers. Second, the laborers were concerned with working to fast because they feared the faster they worked, the less work eventually, there would be, and third, the workers did not have the knowledge of how to work efficiently.

Taylor blamed this all on the lack of attention management paid to the workers. In, trying to find a solution for these issues, Taylor tried to define the role of management. Defining their role to consist of developing one single way to complete a task, to train and teach each worker, to provide incentives for workers to perform tasks well, and to divide work and responsibilities between management and labors.

Taylor’s theory differs from the behavioral approach in the 1900’s by which focuses on understanding the importance of peoples needs and their attitudes within a work place.
After many years of studies and experiments, they found that simply maintaining good social relationships in the work place and making workers feel valued as individuals, said workers produced more outputs.

Both the classical and the behavioral approach were a good starting ground over the years to strive for good management within organizations.
Edwards Deming actually integrated both theories into an approach by which all dimensions of both the environment, as well as the company are considered one system. Deming realized that every system within a business is dependant on the next system. The suppliers depend on customers and internal relationships depend on customers and so on. Therefore, it is necessary for every person of each system to work as a team. And be made aware that each team player is just as important as the next one.

Growing from Deming’s approach is an elaborated...
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