Theorist: Benjamin Bloom

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THEORIST: Benjamin Bloom

Benjamin S. Bloom was a Jewish-American educational psychologist; he was born in Lansford, Pennsylvania on 21st February, 1913. Benjamin Bloom attended the Pennsylvania State University where he obtained a bachelor’s and master’s degrees in 1935. He then moved to the University of Chicago and completed a Ph.D. in education in 1942, and served as a member of the Board of Examinations from 1940 - 1943. In 1944 he was appointed as the Instructor of Educational Psychology; he remained at the University for the next thirty years during which time he was appointed Charles H. Swift Distinguished Service Professor (1970). Benjamin also served as an educational advisor to the governments of Israel, India and many other nations. Benjamin Bloom died at the age of eighty six at his home in Chicago on 13th September 1999. He was survived by his wife Sophie, and his two sons David and Jonathan. Benjamin Bloom made great contributions in the area of education. A great deal of his research focused on the study of educational objectives. Together with a group of cognitive psychologists at the University of Chicago, Bloom developed his theory on taxonomy and his book Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Handbook 1: Cognitive Domain was published in 1956. His theory on taxonomy is his most significant work; it promoted the concept that any given task favors one of three psychological domains: Cognitive, affective, or psychomotor. The cognitive domain deals with the ability to process and utilize (as a measure) information in a meaningful way. The affective domain is concerned with the attitudes and feelings that result from the learning process. Lastly, the psychomotor domain involves manipulative or physical skills (New World Encyclopedia). Like Abraham Maslow and his hierarchy of needs, Bloom believed that in each of his psychological domains there are levels of learning, and an individual must be able to perform at the lower level before they can...
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