Theology of Christology

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Thematic Paper

on

Christology in the Gospels

Submitted to
Mr. Kwok H.B.
of
Alliance Bible Seminary

in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Course of TH512-E:Systematic Theology II
Sept.-Nov, 2005

Margaret, Tse Yin Yi

M024110

November 29, 2005

I.The meaning of Christology3
II. What Can Be Discerned about Jesus from His Words Concerning Issues Other than the Kingdom and Himself3 III. What Can Be Discerned about Jesus from His Deeds and Words Proclaiming the Kingdom of God3 IV. What Can Be Discerned about Jesus from His Words Concerning Himself…3 V. Hosea and “the Son of the Living God” in Mattew 16:16b3 VI. Jesus as Messiah in the Gospel of Luke3

VII. Narrative Christology and the SON OF MAN: What the Marken Jesus says instead3 VIII. Conclusion3
IX. Reference4

I. The meaning of Christology

The Greek for “Messiah” is Christos, whence “Christ”. So, “christology” would discuss how Jesus came to be called the Messiah or Christ and what was meant by that designation. In a broader sense, “christology” discusses any evaluation of Jesus in respect to who he was and the role he played in the divine plan.

Scholars distinguish different kinds of Christology. “Low christology” covers the evaluation of him in terms that do not necessarily include divinity, e.g. Messiah, Rabbi, Prophet, High Priest, Savior, Master. “High christology” covers the evaluation of Jesus in terms that include an aspect of divinity, e.g. Lord, Son of God, God. There are a wide range of conceivable possibilities in understanding the degree or manner of Jesus’ divinity. As to degree, theoretically Jesus could be seen as divine but as lesser than, e.g. angels who were known in the OT as “sons of God”; or Jesus could be deemed equal in divinity to “the one true God” who sent him. As to manner, theoretically Jesus could have been a man who was deified at a point in his career – “made divine”, e.g. at his baptism when the Spirit of God descended on him, or at his resurrection when God elevated him to heaven; or he could have been divine all through his life in the sense that he was conceived as a divine being without a human father; or he could have been uncreated and with the Father forever.

Although the Classical or orthodox Christian faith, articulated in the 4th century, tells us that Jesus as Son was equal to God the Father in all things and existed from all eternity; but that articulation does not tell us how many 1st-century NT authors, if any, had reached that precision. Although Christians maintain that there was divine revelation about the identity of Jesus, but that does not mean that believers understood the revelation completely or at once. The classic passage where Matthew reports that Simon Peter could confess that Jesus was the Messiah, the Son of the living God, because it was revealed to him by Jesus’ Father in heaven (16:16-17), also shows clearly that Peter did not understand essential aspects of that confession (16:22-23).

II. What Can Be Discerned about Jesus from His Words Concerning Issues Other than the Kingdom and Himself

2 What Can Be Discerned from the Knowledge That Jesus shows of the Ordinary Affairs of Life

1 Texts Indicating Limited Knowledge

1 Mark 5:30-33 : Jesus did not know who touched his garments and got healed by his miraculous power while he was walking. “Who touched my cloths?” (Mark 5:30) In Matt 9:22, Jesus turns, sees the woman, and knows what has happened. Matt seems feeling uneasiness about the ignorance that Mark attributes to Jesus. So, Mark seems to be more original.

2 Luke 2:46 : At the age of twelve, Jesus asked questions of the teachers of the Law in the Temple. Luke further described Jesus as growing in wisdom as well as stature and the favour of God (Luke 2:52). So, Luke did not think it strange that Jesus should ask questions or grow in knowledge although he...
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