Theogony: Greek Mythology and Zeus

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Theogony is all about anything of the “ birth of the gods” which is what the title means. In this early creation-time, the gods are synonymous with the universe and the order of the universe. I think that Hesiod’s Theogony is a large-scale synthesis of Greek traditions concerning the gods and it organized as a narrative that tells about the origin of the cosmos and about the gods that shaped cosmos. Also, the gods behave in a very disorderly fashion throughout the Theogony. The poem presents the creation of the gods and the universe and the struggle between fathers and sons and between male force and female birth. Hesiod shows a clear bias for the eventual winner of the fathers-sons struggle, the male sky-god Zeus, and a bias for the male against the female. Hesiod distorts parts of some stories in order to make Zeus and the male powers look good and to make some of the female powers focused around the natural cycle of birth and death look bad.

On the other hand, Hesiod’s Theogony delivers to us the traditional stories of the Greek gods as well as ancient Greek conceptions of the world. I think that the section of Prometheus is the particular well known aspect of the Theogony, the section that tells the tale of Prometheus; it is able to enhance other stories and conceptions. The story of Prometheus shows us two purposes in Hesiod’s Theogony. First, it solidifies Zeus’s position as king of the gods, providing one of the first characterizations of his temperament. Second, it serves as a mode of explanation for those evils in the world which plague mankind. Hesiod’s description of Zeus is the admiration for the god’s power, which makes it ultimately more effective when we finally realize that Zeus was outsmarted by Prometheus. The organizational tools implemented by Hesiod in the delivery of the story of Prometheus set us up for a more tangible comprehension of the outcome. In lines 523-28, Hesiod presents the ultimate fate of Prometheus,...
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