Theme of Margaret Atwood's Poem Journey to the Interior

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Theme of Margaret Atwood's Poem Journey to the Interior

By | Feb. 2012
Page 1 of 3
THEME OF MARGARET ATWOOD’s POEM “JOURNEY TO THE INTERIOR”

Margaret Eleanor Atwood (born on November 18, 1939) a Canadian poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, and environmental activist, is among the most-honoured authors of fiction in recent history. She has been short listed for Booker Prize five times winning once in 2000 for her novel “The Blind Assassin”. Best known for her work as a novelist, she is also a poet, having published 15 books of poetry to date. Many of her poems have been inspired by myths and fairy tales, which have been interests of hers from an early age. Being a novelist she has written very famous novels such as The Edible Woman (1969), Surfacing (1972), Lady Oracle (1976), The Handmaid’s Tale (1985), The Blind Assassin (2000), The Year of the Flood (2009), and many more. Her poetry collection is The Circle Game (1964), Expeditions (1965), Speeches for Doctor Frankenstein (1966), Power Politics (1971), Love Songs of a Terminator (1983), Snake Poems (1983), You Begin (1978), The Door (2007), etc. The poem under scrutiny is “Journey to the Interior” which is a monologue, the apt form for introspection. It is a metaphysical poem with a recurring motif of ‘journey’ with Atwood that she explores in other works like “Surfacing”. ‘Journey to the Interior’ is a subtle, many layered poem with nuances that may be contradictory and therefore wide open to multiple interpretations. The dream like (surreal) mood is created by a pensive (thinking deeply abt smth, especially when u r sad or worried), reflective musing (a period of thinking carefully abt smth or telling people Ur thoughts) tone, at times morbid or melancholic. Written in post-modern style with multiple allusions and disparate (very different from each other) images, it communicates in lateral thinking rather than logical sequential processes. The poem is an allegory as it is a narrative serving an extended metaphor. The...