The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan

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The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan

Presently, as many people enjoy the beauty of the prairie either in the north or in south, they fail or do not understand that a big proportion of those plains are consequently modern era ecological disaster. It is common to hear people talk about “the Dust Bowl or “the Dirty ‘30s”. This is where Timothy Egan in his non-fiction book The Worst Hard Time basis his book, i.e., on the historical 1930 Dust Bowl. In his book, Egan critically examines the origin and the consequences of the Dust Bowl. This book critically evaluates this dust ball and does not ignore the economic and physical effects while still touching one lives lost and lives of the survivors.

In reference to The Worst Hard Time, the Dust Bowl hit a widen plain ranging from Oklahoma panhandles and Texas, extending to the southeastern Colorado and western bit of Kansas to borders of Nebraska. The Oklahoma panhandle was referred to as “no mans land”. Egan writes that, “Anybody who lived in No Man's Land for long knew about nature's capricious power….It was abusive, a beater, a snarling son of a bitch, and then it would forgive and give something back” (Egan 76). The white settles found the native Americans living a nomadic way of life and came along with alternative land use. The white settler drove out the Native Americans who were nomads and later drove out the others from their homestead and began to grow crops by clearing the prairie grasses The clearing of the prairie grass was the beginning of what would be a national disaster.

Initially the farmers earned great prices catalyzed by the high demand from the WWI. This high demand led to more acres of the great plains being cleared as more settlers flocked in to make quick money, it is this demand that resulted to inventions of tractor. 1929, October marked the black Friday as the American economy began to collapse. Considering that 25% of the Americans worked in the farms, this would be a disaster since...
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