The Voice by Thomas Hardly

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THE VOICE BY THOMAS HARDY
(ANALYSIS)

The voice, written by Thomas Hardy, is good example of the human stubbornness, as it is about the author's refusal to accept the death of his wife, called Emma. He is so caught up in his desire for her still that he almost thinks he can hear her voice talking to him. This poem is in the form of a 1st person narrative as Hardy contemplates whether he can hear his dead wife's voice or not. This poem is written in 4 stanzas and the first three stanzas are written in the form of an anapestic metre since it is composed by two short syllables followed by a long one. This conveys Hardy's inital hope as he believes he can hear his wife's voice. However, this behaviour is a natural coping method as Hardy comes to term with the death of his wife. One of the most poignant lines in the poem is "Even in the original air blue gown" Hardy has powerful dillusions of Emma when she was youth full of radiance and beauty. This could also be interpreted as Hardy seeing a phantom or spectre whom he believes to be his wife. This line however does not fit into the rest of the poem so it conforms to some ambiguity. In addition the words such as "wistlesness and listlesness" as add to the ethereal atmosphere of the peom. The last line, " and the woman calling" relates to how Hardy still reminises his wife Emma when he first met her and how these memories are still following him, despite the shift in time. The last stanza however is less fluent and alsmost chaotic in terms of the use of pathetic fallacy, " leaves faltering forward". This reflects on Hardy’s mood and decision that he must move forward and Emma’s voice is imaginary. The poem begins optimistically with a hope that Emma is really addressing Hardy. But by the end, a belief or fear that the “voice” is imaginary has replaced this hope. Regarding to the The rhythm, we can say that this changes throughout the poem, taking into account the feelings of the author in each stanza. Finally, as...
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