The Tyger (William Blake)

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The poem ‘’The Tyger’’ belongs to the collection Songs of Experience of 1794. Blake describes, through a strong tone and an original rhythm, the tiger and he wonders about its creator. The song is divided in six stanzas and in each one appears a question. The rhyme scheme is AA BB. Within the song there are lots of repetition, a peculiar aspect of Blake’s style. The most employed are fire, dread and dare; these words belong to the semantic area of violence and power. The author is speaking to the tiger, the addressee. He’s asking who’s it’s creator, and if it is the same of the lamb? Commonly the tiger is seen as a dangerous animal because of its violence and strength. Blake portrays the tiger as a fierce and energetic creature that is ‘’burning bright’’. It is a very important symbol because it implies fire, the emblem of Strength and especially the symbol of God’s power. Nevertheless the tiger is also fearful and dreadful . It lives ‘’ in the forests of the night’’ , a grim place, symbol of darkness. Moreover its appearance is frightening. Thence the tiger is God shining (burning bright) in the darkness (in forests of the night) thus a God of love but also of violence. Blake recognises this aspect and accepts it even though he does seem disturbed about this double-being. By the way within the poem The author is always asking Who’s the tiger’s creator and if it is the same of the lamb? He doesn’t receive any answer. The lamb and The Tyger are often read together because of their “complementary “ . The Lamb is the personification of innocence and weakness while the tiger is violent and powerful, so is it possible that a single creator made them both? Of course it is, The creator presents two different natures: the good one and the evil one this implies that Without contraries progress is impossible.
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