The Truth Cannot Set You Free

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The Truth Cannot Set you Free
The Crucible, written by Arthur Miller, is a tragic story of injustice suffered by an innocent community who are subjected to the hypocritical, prideful judges of their trial. These Judges use their power to eliminate evidence of their mistakes and return their community to puritanical ways. The leaders of Salem are not concerned with seeking the truth and justice, but with maintaining their authority and reputations; this objective leads them to consistently rejecting truth, against all logic and evidence of their senses. The symbols of truth portrayed throughout the play are exhibited through a handful of innocent hearted characters in the book such as Elizabeth Proctor. Her virtues of dignity and honesty are evident in the ways she calmly argues against Danforth and Hale's accusations hat she is somehow involved in witchcraft. Although she nearly contradicts herself as a symbol of truthfulness when she lies about John's adultery; it is very admirable to try to protect her husband, and she understands later when he recants. This is an example of her ability to grasp the wider issues of morality. Rebecca Nurse is the epitome of morality a woman known to have great wisdom and compassion. Her moral character is evident in her adamant refusal to not sign a confession. When Rebecca is brought into the room where John Proctor is about to sign a confession her aura of morality and sensibility moves him to take a stand for integrity and follow her example. Rhodes2

The main portrayer of the truth in the play is Mr. John Proctor. When accusations are so viciously presented at the trials he is determined to tell the truth even if it means criticizing and antagonizing the investigators. These people who embrace the truth in Salem are the victims of their prideful accusers who are intent to pass the blame as to not be accused themselves no matter what the cost. Equally as relevant as the symbols of truth portrayed...
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